Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation

 

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Air Vice-Marshal Sir Matthew Frew


Matthew Brown              b: 7 Apr 1895                 r: 19 Dec 1948                  d: 28 May 1974

KBE - 1 Jan 1948, CB - 1 Jan 1943, DSO - 4 Mar 1918, Bar - 6 Oct 1933, MC -18 Oct 1917, Bar - 17 Dec 1917, AFC - 3 Jun 1919, MiD - 18 Apr 1918, MiD - 30 May 1918, SMMV - 12 Sep 1918, GI(s)C - 24 Sep 1943, MC1 (B) - 12 Jun 1945.

For a list of foreign decoration abbreviations, click here

(Army): - (T) 2 Lt (P): 26 Sep 1916,  (T) Capt: 24 Oct 1917, (T) Lt: 26 Mar 1918,

(RAF): - (T) Capt [Lt]: 1 Apr 1918, Flt Lt: 24 Oct 1919 [1 Apr 1918], Sqn Ldr: 1 Jul 1927, Wg Cdr: 1 Jul 1934, Gp Capt: 1 Jul 1938, (T) A/Cdre: 1 Dec 1940, Act AVM: 16 Sep 1942, (T) AVM: 1 Jun 1943, A/Cdre (WS): 16 Sep 1943, A/Cdre: 1 Dec 1943, AVM: 1 Jan 1946.

xx xxx 1914:             Private, Highland Light Infantry.

xx xxx xxxx:                Cadet, RFC.

26 Sep 1916:              U/T Pilot, RFC.

 6 Apr 1917:               Flying Officer, RFC.

28 Apr 1917:              Pilot, No 45 Sqn RFC.

24 Oct 1917:              Flight Commander, No 45 Sqn RFC.

xx xxx 1918:               Instructor, CFS.

 5 May 1919:              Transferred to Unemployed List

24 Oct 1919:              Awarded Short Service Commission in the rank of Flight Lieutenant (Aeroplane)

19 Feb 1920:              Air Staff, HQ No 7 Group.

 8 Jun 1920:                Staff/Instructor, Ground Wing, RAF (Cadet) College.

25 Oct 1920:              Instructor, Flying Wing, RAF (Cadet) College

 8 Dec 1921:               Flight Commander, No 6 Sqn.

14 Oct 1923:               QFI, No 4 FTS.

16 Dec 1925:               Staff, Armament and Gunnery School.

24 Jul 1927:                 CFI?, No 1 FTS.

10 Mar 1931:               Air Staff - Operations, HQ Iraq Command.

11 May 1933:              Officer Commanding, No 111 Sqn.

 1 Aug 1934:                Officer Commanding, No 10 Sqn.

22 Mar 1937:               Officer Commanding, RAF Hornchurch. (took over 2 Apr 1937)

25 Jul 1938:                  SASO, HQ No 23 (Training) Group.

 1 Sep 1940:                 AOC, Training HQ, SAAF

16 Sep 1942:                AOC, Directorate of Air Training, SAAF

Hit by AA fire on 15 January 1918, he suffered neck pains and was invalided back to Britain the following month.

Citation for the award of the Military Cross

"T./2nd Lt. Matthew Brown Frew, Gen. List and R.F.C.

For conspicuous gallantly and devotion to duty on patrol, showing a fine offensive spirit in many combats. He has shot down five enemy aeroplanes, on one occasion leading his formation to attack twenty-two Albatross Scouts, and himself shooting one down"

(London Gazette - 7 March 1918)

Citation for the award of the Bar to the Military Cross

"T./2nd Lt. Matthew Brown Frew, M.C., Gen. List and R.F.C.

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in shooting down three enemy machines in two days. He has destroyed eight enemy machines and driven down many others out of control."

(London Gazette - 23 April 1918)

Citation for the award of the Distinguished Service Order

T./Capt. Matthew Brown Frew, M.C., Gen. List and R.F.C.

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  On one occasion when leader of a patrol he shot down an enemy aeroplane, two others being also accounted for in the same fight. On a later occasion he destroyed three enemy machines in one combat, all of which were seen to crash to the ground. Immediately after this combat he had to switch off his engine and make an attempt to glide towards our lines five miles away on account of his machine having received a direct hit.  Owing to the great skill and courage he displayed in the handling of his damaged machine, he succeeded in bringing it safely to our lines. He has destroyed twenty-two enemy machines up to date.

(London Gazette - )

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