Air of Authority - A History of RAF Organisation

 

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RAF Regiment Squadrons 2700 - 2850

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Also visit RAF Regiment.net

2700 Squadron

Formed as Light Anti Aircraft unit in the UK in June 1946, the squadron was disbanded by being renumbered  15 Squadron in June 1947.

2701 Squadron

Formed as No 701 Squadron in London on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Regiment Depot in 1942 and Catterick in February 1944 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role within 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, before moving over to the continent in August 1944.  It was based at Melsbroek during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945). 

It later moved to Fassberg in Germany, where it disbanded in September 1945.  Members of the squadron were awarded one MM (Sergeant George Toye - see below) )and five Mentions in Despatches.

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"964295 Sergeant George Daniel TOYE, R.A.F.V.R., R.A.F. Regiment.

In January, 1945, Sergeant Toye was in command of a detachment which had been withdrawn from action for airfield patrol duties. The gun had been left in a position ready for action. At about 09.25 hours mother airman, who was on sentry duty, warned Sergeant Toye of the approach of between 36 and 50 enemy aircraft. Sergeant Toye immediately ordered his men to " take post " and in spite of the automatic loader being filled with A.P. ammunition, got the gun into action with such speed that he was able to engage the first of 6 M.E.l09's which came in to attack a nearby dispersal ground. Immediately afterwards 4 F.W.190's and 2 M.E.109's attacked Sergeant Toye's gun post. Cannon shells and machine gun bullets struck all around and casualties were sustained. Undeterred Sergeant Toye continued to instruct his men and engaged the attackers as they dived low to attack; one after another in rapid succession. The deliberate attack against the gun post was temporarily abandoned.  Sergeant Toye then engaged a M.E. 109 which was coming in to attack aircraft on the ground; a hit was obtained and the enemy aircraft was observed to go down omitting black smoke. A further 2 F.W.190's then came in to attack the gun post.

Sergeant Toye remained unperturbed and engaged the aircraft as they came in to attack almost simultaneously from different angles. One of the attackers was hit and set on fire. This was the first occasion on which the detachment had been under enemy fire. Sergeant Toye's outstanding courage, initiative and leadership inspired his comrades arid contributed largely to the success achieved."

(London Gazette – 13 April 1945)

 

2702 Squadron

Formed as No 702 Squadron at Harrow on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.   Moving to Yatesbury in April 1943, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May.  In 1944 it was moved to the south coast to take part in anti-Diver operations, later moving to Tangmere.  It disbanded in February 1945, to be reformed on the merger with No 2 Armoured Car Company on 31 October 1946.  The squadron was disbanded by being renumbered  No 2 Squadron on 25 February 1947 at Ramlah.

2703 Squadron

Formed as No 703 Squadron at Worcester on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and Catterick in 1943.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role within 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 and moved to the continent on D + 8.  It was based at Eindhoven during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  It later served at Achmer, Celleand then  Flensburg, where the squadron disbanded in December 1945.

2704 Squadron

Formed as No 704 Squadron at Llanbedr on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.   It moved to the RAF Regiment Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943, later moving to Kenley.  It moved to Tangmere in  1944 and by June 1944 was at Bolt Head, where it took part in anti-Diver operations.  By early 1945, it was at North Weald and it disbanded at Folkingham in October 1945.

2705 Squadron

Formed as No 705 Squadron at Fairwood Common on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Regiment Depot in 1942 and North Coates in 1943.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1944.

2706 Squadron

Formed as No 706 Squadron at Andreas on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and Hemswell in 1943, where it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  It joined ACSEA in August 1944  serving initially at Agartala and later Dohazari, Maungsaw, Akyab and finally Hong Kong, disbanding in May 1946.

2707 Squadron

Formed as No 707 Squadron at Ballykelly on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and later moved to Hawkinge (Gravesend) and West Mailing (Lympne) during 1944 as well as taking part in anti-Diver operations.  The squadron disbanded in October 1945.

Also visit RAF Regiment.net

2708 Squadron

Formed as No 708 Squadron at Northolt on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Oakington in 1943 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  It was transferred to ACSEA in  October 1944 serving at Agartala and later Meiktila,Toungoo, Calcutta and Hong Kong, disbanding in May 1946.  Members of the squadron were awarded one MM (see below) and one Mention in Despatches.

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

1408185 Sergeant Norman Phillip GERRISH, R.A.F.V.R., 2708 Squadron, R.A.F. Regiment.

Sergeant Gerrish was in charge of a rifle flight during an action at Meiktila airstrip which the enemy had infiltrated at night. He sustained a leg wound early in the battle, but he rallied his men, taking over a . light machine-gun and returning the enemy fire with -good effect, causing casualties. When his ammunition was expended he took over another gun and .ran forward to a position from which he could cover the withdrawal of the flights. His fire was so effective that all personnel were able to cross open ground and reach cover. Only then did Sergeant Gerrish make his way across the airstrip in full view of the enemy. His courage, determination and leadership were instrumental in holding two companies of the 5aPanese and for their ultimate defeat, during which 20 of the enemy were killed. This airman set a magnificent example in the face of strong opposition.

(London Gazette - 7 September 1945)

2709 Squadron

Formed as No 709 Squadron at Henlow on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Biggin Hill in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and moved again, to Tangmere in 1944, during which period took part in anti-Diver operations. It also served at Detling and Hawkinge.  The squadron disbanded at Folkingham in October 1945.

2710 Squadron

Formed as No 710 Squadron at Valley on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. Moving to West Malling in 1942 converting to a Field squadron in March 1943.  In October 1943, it was part of RAF Force 131 which landed in the Azores to take control of the airfield at Lagens.  It converted to the Rifle role in July 1944, before returning to the UK in October, moving onto the continent in May 1945 at Flensberg, where it disbanded in May 1946.

2711 Squadron

Formed as No 711 Squadron at Crosby on Eden on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moves followed to Croydon in 1942 and Pevensey in 1943, It also served at Bawdsey and Filey.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and disbanded in June 1944.

Also visit RAF Regiment.net

2712 Squadron

Formed as No 712 Squadron at Ballyhalbert on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Mildenhall in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron disbanded in July 1944.

2713 Squadron

Formed as No 713 Squadron at HQ Fighter Command, Bentley Priory, on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Converting to the Field role in October 1943, it joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, converting to a Rifle squadron in July.  Further moves took it to Mildenhall and Lakenheath.  It moved onto the continent in August 1944  serving at Rennes and Caen in France, Brussels, on the Leopold Canal and Ghent in Belgium.  In 1945 it entered Germany serving at Bonn and Hesselburg in 1945 and Luneburg in 1946, before being disbanded by being renumbered  51 Squadron on 21 August 1947.

2714 Squadron

Formed as No 714 Squadron at Warmwell on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Skeabrae in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron disbanded in July 1944.  One of its members was awarded a Mention in Despatches.

2715 Squadron

Formed as No 715 Squadron at Dishforth on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and Manston in 1943.  It was also based at Hunsdon at some period during its existence.  It converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, converting to a Rifle squadron in December 1944.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945 and moved onto the continent in February to Gilze Rijen and later Knokke, where it disbanded in December 1945.

2716 Squadron

Formed as No 716 Squadron at Finningley on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  In April 1942, it was at RAF Skitten and during a defence exercise, an intruder in civilian clothes was challenged by a squadron gunner, the intruder produced a pistol and counter challenged the airman to surrender, the airman, having been given live ammunition instead shot and wounded the intruder.  The intruder turned out to be Lieutenant McKenzie of the 9th Seaforth Highlanders, whose platoon was involved in the exercise.  The airman was later ambushed by the Seaforths and spent several weeks in hospital as a result. It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron disbanded in July 1944, by which time it was based at RAF Holme-on-Spalding Moor.

2717 Squadron

Formed as No 717 Squadron at Hemswell on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Tangmere in 1943  converting to a Field squadron in March.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 and became a Rifle squadron in July 1944, moving onto the continent in August 1944, becoming together with 2757 Squadron and an RAF Air Intelligence Team the first RAF unit to enter Rouen.  It later  moved into Belgium, serving at Brussels Maele, Damme, on the Leopold Canal and Antwerp before arriving at Melsbroek, where it was based during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945). 

In 1945 it moved to Celle before being transferred from BAFO to Palestine in October 1945, serving at Ramleh, Petat Tiqav and Jerusalem, disbanding by being renumbered  52 (Rifle) Squadron on 8 June 1947.  During its service in North-West Europe, four members of the squadron were awarded the Croix de Guerre.

2718 Squadron

Formed as No 718 Squadron at Leeming on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Hornchurch in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron disbanded in June 1945, by which time it was based at Ford.

2719 Squadron

Formed as No 719 Squadron at Lindholme on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. It moved to Coltishall in 1942 and Wittering in 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 converting to a Rifle squadron in July 1944 and it moved onto the continent in November 1944.  Initially based at Waspik Boven, it was at Grimbergen during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  It later served at Jever, Buckeburg and finally Detmold, where the squadron disbanded in April 1946.

Also visit RAF Regiment.net

2720 Squadron

Formed as No 720 Squadron at Linton-on-Ouse on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in June 1943 and in 1944 moved to Manston, where it took part in anti-Diver operations.  The squadron disbanded in September 1945.

2721 Squadron

Formed as No 721 Squadron at Mildenhall on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Kenley in 1942, converting to a Field squadron in October 1942.  In November 1942, it took part in Operation Torch arriving in one of the follow-on convoys, initially being held in reserve to support No 325 Wing when it arrived and was allocated a forward airfield along with No 4092 LAA Flight.  When Group Captain David Atcherley, decided to set up a radar unit on the coast at Cap Serrat, 2721 Squadron and 4092 Flight were tasked with supporting the mobile radar unit as they made their way to their planned locations and defending them once in position.  When the conditions got too bad for vehicles, Plt Off Steele of the squadron hired camels and managed to get the units to their destination. At the end of February 1943, the German counter attack brought them into close proximity of this station and orders were given for its withdrawal.  The Navy were able to remove the vital equipment by sea, whilst 2721 and 4092 provided close support to the withdrawal and 2788 and 4089 provided the rear guard cover.

In April 1943, the squadron was operating as part of the 3rd Infantry Brigade  and was allocated a sector of the line near Medjez el Bab.  During the night of 20/21 April, the 25 pounder guns of the squadron succeeded in repelling a German armoured counter-attack.  They were also responsible to a number of patrols in 'No-Mans-Land', in which they retrieved a number of downed RAF and USAAF airmen.  The squadron was transferred to 2nd Infantry Brigade on 3 May.  Between 6 - 12 May the squadron was part of  'S' Force, a group established to locate and secure enemy equipment and personnel in the Bizerta and Tunis areas.

For the invasion of Sicily, the squadron was allocated to HQ North African Tactical Air Forces.  During its time in North Africa personnel of the squadron were mentioned in despatches four times.  It  moved to  Italy in December 1943, serving at Bagnoli, Cerignola and Anzio.  Attached to the US 5th Army, it acted as escort to the USAAF technical intelligence team, tasked with locating and seizing secret documents and equipment.  As a result the squadron was responsible for capturing Ciampino airfield near Rome and entered Rome itself with leading US elements.  As a result of their successful support of the US units, the CO, Squadron Leader McMichael was awarded the US Bronze Star. 

In September 1944 the squadron was placed under X Corps of the 8th Army, with whom it supported the King's Dragoon Guards and then the Household Cavalry.  In October it was attached to the Lovat Scouts and in November to Skinner's Horse (Indian Army) and then the 27th Lancers.  Whilst attached to these Army units it operated at Perugia and later Citta di Castello, Rimini, Cesena, Fosso di Ghiaia, Classe Fuori and Ravenna.  From Ravenna, the squadron was attached to Lord Strathcona's Horse of the Canadian Brigade until they reached the River Lamone , where they came under the command the 7th Hussars until relieved by No 2788 Squadron in December 1944.   In Italy members of the squadron were awarded one MBE, one MC (Squadron Leader McMichael), five MMs (see below), and 17 Mentions in Despatches, as well as the US Bronze Star mentioned above. 

Some members of the squadron had been trained in parachuting and became part of a Special Duties Section known as Celyforce (after its CO Squadron Leader Cely-Travilian).  Its role was to support RAF Air Liaison Teams, but Tito's refusal to permit their use resulted in Celyforce being attached to the Special Boat Section.  In December 1945 moved to Palestine, serving at St Jean and Ein Shemer.  It became a Rifle squadron in January 1946 and disbanded by being renumbered  No 53 Squadron on 8 June 1947 at Ein Shamer.

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"1047842 Corporal Tom SQUIRE, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Royal Air Force Regiment.

One morning in November, 1944, Corporal Squire was in charge of his leading section during an attack against the Sugar Factory at Classe Fuori, south of Ravenna. The objective was strongly fortified and the only approach was a single and narrow route which was heavily defended by machine guns. Displaying conspicuous courage and outstanding determination, Corporal Squire led his section into the attack.

Despite the intensity of the enemy counter-fire, Corporal Squire went straight on to his first objectives and cleared the enemy posts, thereby enabling the remainder of the flight to continue the attack without check. Corporal Squire's courage and determination greatly inspired his comrades and contributed in a large measure to the success achieved. He has, on many occasions, led his section on patrols against the enemy. He has invariably displayed fine leadership and has set a magnificent example."

(London Gazette – 27 March 1945)

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"743170 Corporal Alexander George BRADFIELD, Royal Air Farce Volunteer Reserve, R.A.F. Regiment.

Throughout the period his Squadron has been under the command of the Eighth Army, Corporal Bradfield, who is non-commissioned officer in charge of signals, has been responsible for the communications between Headquarters and the various flights and commanding formations. He has displayed very great endurance under exceptionally hard conditions in the mountains when operating south of Ravenna and, later, on the River Lamone with a Canadian Armoured Brigade. During the period November 19/30th, 1944, covering the attack and occupation of the enemy strong-point known as the Sugar Factory at Classe Fuari, Corporal Bradfield showed great bravery in going out to repair broken wires along stretches of open road which were continually being swept by enemy shell and mortar fire.  On one occasion he was pinned down for over an hour by very accurate mortar fire but he carried on and completed the task. Although fully aware from these experiences of the danger of his work he has never hesitated and has gone out at all hours by day and night and up to the end of the squadron's operational period: he has displayed the same disregard for danger. His courage, steadiness and devotion to duty under the most harassing conditions have been outstanding."

(London Gazette – 13 April 1945)

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"1495461 Leading Aircraftman William WEARDEN, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, R.A.F. Regiment.

During the period September/December, 1944, Leading Aircraftman Wearden's Squadron has been under the command of the Eighth Army and has operated in the mountains, and, after the fall of Ravenna, on the Lamone River with a Canadian Armoured Brigade. Throughout these operations Leading Aircraftman Wearden has carried out the duty of Flight Signaller in an exceptional and outstanding manner. He has gone out on many patrols to make contact with the enemy and kept a wireless link with his headquarters whilst thus operating. During the period 19th to 30th November, 1944, whilst operating near the Sugar Factory of Classe Fueri and from 8th to 17th December when his Flight was holding a very exposed position on the River Lamone, north of Messano, he has maintained his communications under long periods of enemy fire by shell and mortar, showing a total disregard for his own safety and often working on open stretches of road in full view of enemy observation and fire. Leading Aircraftman Weafden has worked for very long periods without rest and his courage and devotion to duty under circumstances of great hardship have set a fine example."

(London Gazette – 13 April 1945)

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"1352483 Corporal Philip Louis Austin SHORT, Royal Air Force Regiment.

This airman is employed as section commander of No. 2 Rifle Flight. He has served overseas with 2721 Field Squadron on active service for over -two years and has on many occasions' been in contact with the enemy in North Africa and Italy.  During the period September-December, 1944, when this squadron was under the  command of the Eighth Army, he not only led his section against the enemy many times but also acted as the flight senior N.C.O. On one 'occasion on Mount  Acola, during a .reconnaissance with his officer, both were ambushed by the enemy from a farm. Corporal Short, with quick initiative and clear thought, gave his officer supporting -fire and enabled him to withdraw safely. At all times eager to volunteer for any dangerous task, this airman has displayed outstanding leadership, cool .courage and determination."

(London Gazette – 13 April 1945)

2722 Squadron

Formed as No 722 Squadron at Newton on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Hendon in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and in 1944 moved to Folkstone, where it took part in anti-Diver operations.  It later converted to a Rifle squadron in October 1944, before disbanding in April 1945.

2723 Squadron

Formed as No 723 Squadron at Oakington on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Tangmere in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron disbanded in September 1945, by which time it was based at North Weald.

2724 Squadron

Formed as No 724 Squadron at Scampton on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Regiment Depot in 1942 and Feltwell in 1943, becoming a Field Squadron in March 1943.  It converted to a Rifle squadron in September 1944 and moved to the continent in November 1944, operating at Capelle, Warpik, Gilze Rijen, Fassberg, Celle and Gatow.  The squadron was disbanded by being renumbered  No 54 Squadron on 21 August 1947.  During the North-West European campaign, one member of the squadron was mentioned in despatches.

2725 Squadron

Formed as No 725 Squadron at Stradishall on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and was one of three units defending the radar station at  Swingate in late 1943, where the squadron disbanded in April 1945.

2726 Squadron

Formed as No 726 Squadron at Swinderby on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942, becoming a Field Squadron in March 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, converting to a Rifle squadron in August 1944 and moving to the continent in August 1944.  Here it served at Eindhoven, on the Wilhelmina Canal, Maas, Luneburg, Lubeck, Schleswig Holstein and Vandel before returning to Lubeck, where it disbanded at  in March 1946.  During the North-West European campaign, three members of the squadron was mentioned in despatches.

2727 Squadron

Formed as No 727 Squadron at Syerston on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Henlow in 1943 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July.  During the V1 attacks it was based at Eastbourne as part of the anti-Diver defences. It was also based at Hunsdon at some period during its existence.  The squadron disbanded in February 1946 and personnel of the squadron were awarded  a BEM and 2 Mentions in Despatches.

2728 Squadron

Formed as No 728 Squadron at Waterbeach on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in October 1942 and was one of three units defending the radar station at  Swingate in late 1943. It was also based at Hunsdon at some period during its existence.  It disbanded in June 1944, by which time it was at Branscombe. 

2729 Squadron

Formed as No 729 Squadron at Waddington on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Regiment Depot in 1942, becoming a Field Squadron in March 1943.  Converting to a Rifle squadron in July 1944, it moved to the continent in August 1944, serving at Bayeaux and Trouville in France, on the Wilhelmina Canal in Holland. It then moved into Germany serving at Bad Eilsen (No 2 Group HQ) and Gatow, where the squadron disbanded in March 1946.  It was reformed as part of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force in 1985 to operate 35mm Oerlikon cannons and Skyguard radars captured in the Falkland Islands during the war of 1982 but disbanded again in 1993.

Also visit RAF Regiment.net

2730 Squadron

Formed as No 730 Squadron at Wyton on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in October 1942 and later moved to Bawdsey and then to the Regiment Depot at Grantham, where it disbanded in June 1944.

2731 Squadron

Formed as No 731 Squadron at Abingdon on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and in July 1943 was operating in East Yorkshire, where it brought down a Dornier 217 attacking RAF Catfoss.  It converted to being a Rifle squadron in October 1944,  moving to the continent in February 1945, initially serving at St Omer.  The squadron then moved into Germany, where it disbanded at Hamburg in August 1946.

2732 Squadron

Formed as No 732 Squadron at Bassingbourn on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and during the anti-Diver operations of 1944, it was based at Rye.  It disbanded at Llanbedr in April 1945.

2733 Squadron

Formed as No 733 Squadron at Benson on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. Moving to Manston in 1943, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Hawkinge.  The squadron disbanded in April 1945.

2734 Squadron

Formed as No 734 Squadron at Bicester on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  It was also based at Hunsdon at some point in this period. The squadron moved onto the continent on D + 11, serving at Beny-sur-Mer, Brussels, Eindhoven and Volkel before arriving at Heesch, where it was based during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  It later served at Fassberg and Lubeck, where it disbanded  in December 1945.

2735 Squadron

Formed as No 735 Squadron at Bramcote on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Martlesham in 1942, where it also became involved in refuelling and rearming aircraft.  It converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Allhallows.  The squadron disbanded in April 1945.

2736 Squadron

Formed as No 736 Squadron at Cottesmore on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to Feltwell in 1943 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, moving onto the continent on D + 12, being based at Courselle.  It  then moved to Gilze Rijen where it was based during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  In 1945 it moved to Wunstorf, where it disbanded in November.  During the North-West European campaign one member of the squadron was mentioned in despatches.

2737 Squadron

Formed as No 737 Squadron at Harwell on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943.  In May 1943 it was despatched to Norway, where it served at Kristianasand, Kjevic, Lister and Oslo, where it disbanded in December 1945.  Four member of the squadron were awarded the King Haakon Medal.

2738 Squadron

Formed as No 738 Squadron at Upper Heyford on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to St. Eval in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943, being deployed to Eastbourne to counter the Luftwaffe's 'tip and run' raids.  It converted to the Rifle squadron role in October 1944.  It moved onto the continent in January 1945, being based at St Omer and Mons before moving into Germany, where it disbanded at Bonn in July 1946.

2739 Squadron

Formed as No 739 Squadron at Upwood on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942  converting to a Field squadron in March 1943.  In November 1943, the squadron was based at Bradwell Bay, where on one day they assisting in turning around 132 Spitfires and on another, four complete Spitfire squadrons.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, but was then transferred to the Far East for service with ACSEA in November 1944.  Having landed in Bombay, it was initially deployed to Secunderabad and then Calcutta, Chittagong, Maungdaw, Warangal, Madras, Sumatra and Medan, where it disbanded in February 1946.  Three members of the squadron were mentioned in despatches.

Also visit RAF Regiment.net

2740 Squadron

Formed as No 740 Squadron at Moreton-in-the-Marsh on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and the Rifle role October 1944.  It moved onto the continent in February 1945, serving at St Omer, Weeze, Vandel and Celle before disbanding at Gatow in September 1946.

2741 Squadron

Formed as No 741 Squadron at Pershore on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Northolt in 1942 it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and became a Rifle squadron in October 1944.  It moved onto the continent in January 1945, serving at Ghent and Liege, before disbanding at Detmold in August 1946.

2742 Squadron

Formed as No 742 Squadron at Wellesbourne Mountford on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 converting to a Field squadron in March 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, becoming an Armoured Car Unit in August 1944 and moving to the continent in November. It served at Maas and Waal before arriving at Evere, where it was based  during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  Moving into Germany, it served at Remagen and Bonn.  During its brief tour in North-West Europe, members of the squadron were awarded one Order of Leopold, six Croix de Guerre and three mentions in despatches.  It moved to Palestine in October 1945, serving at Petat Yiqva and Ramat David, disbanding in August 1946.

2743 Squadron

Formed as No 743 Squadron at Topcliffe on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and transferred to ACSEA in January 1945.  Initially deployed to Argatala, it later moved to Ondauk, Ondaw, Calcutta and finally Honk Kong, where it disbanded in February 1946.

2744 Squadron

Formed at Dyce as No 744 Squadron on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers, by which time it had moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 converting to become a Field squadron in October 1942.  In November 1942, it took part in Operation Torch arriving in one of the follow-on convoys, initially being deployed to protect No 324 (Fighter) Wing at Constantine airfield along with No 4091 LAA Flight.  In January 1943, the squadron and 4091 Flight joined No 2825 Squadron and No 4088 Flight at Souk el Khemis, where three landing grounds had been constructed. 

In April 1944, together with 4091 Flight, it was attached to the 24th Guards Brigade, taking over a sector of the line from the 5th Northamptonshire Regiment, whilst its armoured car flight was attached to the 1st Divisional Reconnaissance Regiment.  During a patrol one of their cars was hit and AC1 Robert Quigley was able to extract an injured colleague, keep the enemy at bay until his ammunition was exhausted and evade capture, eventually reaching the British lines with his injured colleague 24 hours later. 

Between 6 - 12 May the squadron was part of  'S' Force, a group established to locate and secure enemy equipment and personnel in the Bizerta and Tunis areas.  When the Italian Garrison on the island of Lampedusa surrendered, the squadron deployed to the island together with No 2864 Squadron, remaining until September when it returned to North Africa before moving onto Italy in December .  During its time in North Africa personnel of the squadron were mentioned in despatches six times.

Arriving in Italy in December 1943, it was initially based in the Naples area and later moved to Cassino and took part on operations on the Gothic Line.  In May 1945 it to Austria (Zeltweg) and then Greece (Glifhada) before disbanding in April 1946.  From the point it arrived in Italy, members of the squadron were awarded two OBEs, one MBE, two MCs (Flying Officer Ringer and Flying Officer Harris - see below), 3 BEMs, 2 MMs (one to Corporal Hope) and 14 Mentions in Despatches.

Citation for the award of the Military Cross

"Flying Officer Stanley William Robert HARRIS (119740), R.A.F.V.R., Royal Air Force Regiment.

On the 27th September, 1944, Flying Officer Harris accompanied by 2 airmen drove a jeep into the forward areas. As the party entered the village of Stradone they were fired at by snipers and compelled to leave the jeep and take cover in a nearby building. Shortly afterwards 4 army stretcher bearers were also compelled to take cover close by. The enemy fire continued. Flying Officer Harris led the 2 parties from the rear of the building in an attempt to get clear of the danger area. As they reached the main road heavy mortar fire was encountered; Flying Officer Harris was seriously wounded in the chest. All other members of his party with the exception of a corporal were wounded and some were unable to walk. Flying Officer Harris assisted by the uninjured corporal walked back to the village and retrieved the jeep. Having been assisted into the seat Flying Officer Harris drove the vehicle back to the injured personnel who were then conveyed to the nearest field dressing station some 4 miles away. On arrival, Flying Officer Harris collapsed from loss of blood and the intense pain he had suffered. The outstanding courage, fortitude and  devotion to duty displayed by this officer are worthy of high praise."

(London Gazette - 9 February 1945)

Citation for the award of the Military Cross

"Flying Officer Joseph Francis RINGER (123664), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve."

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"1010664 Corporal Richard Robert HOPE, Royal Air Force Volunteer 'Reserve.

On 16th April, 1945, Flying Officer Ringer was ordered to reconnoitre and lay a ground to air landmark near to Castel San Pietro which was occupied by the enemy. In a jeep, accompanied by Corporal Hope, he made repeated attempts to reach high ground south of the town but was unsuccessful owing to mined roads and blown bridges. He then decided to try another route and soon came under heavy shell fire but took cover. When the shelling had ceased he proceeded to the objective and carried out his mission.  He then returned to bring up the landmark party.  On 22nd April, 1945, Flying Officer' Ringer executed a similar reconnaissance in the San Giorgio area. Accompanied by Corporal Hope, he arrived in the area twenty minutes before the armoured columns sent to capture it and the site chosen was for some while under rifle and machine gun fire from enemy positions. Later in April, Z945, when under the command of the 2nd New Zealand Division, this officer was again ordered to lay a landmark as far forward as possible on the south bank of the river Adige in order to assist the leading division to .break through the Venetian line. Flying Officer Ringer, with Corporal Hope, went forward with the leading platoon under heavy enemy fire and with great difficulty succeeded' in accomplishing the mission. . When enemy snipers became active they organised a patrol and cleared the area. From - 29th April to 2nd May, 1945, the detachment continued to assist the New Zealand Division through to Trieste under most arduous conditions.  This officer and airman displayed outstanding courage and leadership when the enemy was attempting to delay our forward troops in order to organise his retreating forces to hold the Venetian line."

(London Gazette - 4 January 1946)

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

“1060048 Corporal Harry GREEN, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Royal Air Force Regiment.

Corporal Green has led his section on patrols against the enemy and has at all times displayed outstanding courage and devotion to duty, qualities which have been reflected in the efficiency of those under his command. During the concentration of the 2nd Polcorps at San Sofia it became essential to discover the precise position of the enemy prior to an attack being made. On the 16th October, 1944, Corporal Green led a patrol detailed to go to Collina Di Pondo.  Leading his men on a wide detour, through enemy held territory, Corporal Green, approached his objective from the flank unobserved. As the first building entered by the patrol showed signs of recent occupation Corporal Green went on to the next farm where the enemy were encountered in great strength. The patrol was attacked with grenades and automatics. During this attack a German sentry was killed and other casualties were inflicted on the enemy. Corporal Green, realising that at least one member of his patrol must get back and report the position, directed covering fire to be made on the farm and this enabled the remainder of the patrol to take cover in a nearby wood. Although an enemy machine gun was now in action Corporal Green succeeded in withdrawing his men and the patrol returned without a casualty.”

(London Gazette – 23 March 1945)

Citation for the award of the British Empire Medal

"613592 Sergeant Frederick John CURGENVEN, Royal Air Force, No. 2744 Squadron, Royal Air Force Regiment.

From 14th March to 24th April, 1945, Sergeant Curgenven was in charge of a detachment operating with the 2nd Polish Corps on the East bank of the Senio river. He rendered outstanding service in siting, laying and maintaining, under enemy fire, ground to air landmarks as navigational aids to heavy, medium and fighter bomber aircraft. This non-commissioned officer did excellent work in support of the ground forces."

(London Gazette - 2 July 1946)

2745 Squadron

Formed as No 745 Squadron at Leuchars on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Skaebrae in 1942 it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and disbanded in October 1943, having subsequently served at Biggin Hill and on the Isle of Wight.

2746 Squadron

Formed as No 746 Squadron at Lossiemouth on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and during the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Detling, after which it was disbanded in September 1944.  The squadron disbanded in April 1945.  One member of the squadron was awarded a Mention in Despatches.

2747 Squadron

Formed as No 747 Squadron at Kinloss on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in April 1945, by which time it was based at Filey.

2748 Squadron

Formed as No 748 Squadron at Wick on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. Moving to  in 1942 and Sumburgh in 1943, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  It absorbed No 2778 Squadron in September 1944 and was transferred to ACSEA in January 1945.  Initially deployed to Argatala, it later moved to Santa Cruz, into Malaya and then onto Singapore, Tengah, Java, Batavia, Surabaya and Bali, where it disbanded in April 1946.

2749 Squadron

Formed as No 749 Squadron at Grantham on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Wick in 1942 and Scampton in 1943, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in August 1944 becoming a Rifle squadron in September 1944, it moved to the continent in April 1945 serving at Detmold and Gutersloh before moving to Wahn, where it disbanded in September 1946.

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2750 Squadron

Formed as No 750 Squadron at Carew Cheriton on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. Moving to Duxford in 1942 and Wittering in 1943, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in June.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 becoming a Rifle squadron in September 1944, moving to the continent in December 1944, initially serving at Mons in Belgium.  On moving into Germany in 1945 it served in Bonn, Achmer, Bochum and Osnabruck, until in 1946 it moved to Wahn, where the squadron was disbanded by being renumbered  No 55 Squadron on 21 August 1947.  During the North-West European campaign one member of the squadron was awarded the Croix de Guerre.

2751 Squadron

Formed as No 751 Squadron at Sullom Voe on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Eastchurch in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1944.

2752 Squadron

Formed as No 752 Squadron at Stranraer on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and later acted as defence of the radar stations at Swingate and later still, Hawkshill Down.  It was disbanded in April 1945.

2753 Squadron

Formed as No 753 Squadron at Turnhouse on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Regiment Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Allhallows, disbanding in November 1945.

2754 Squadron

Formed as No 754 Squadron at Limavady on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and disbanded in July 1944, which time it was based at Stradishall.

2755 Squadron

Formed as No 755 Squadron at Lough Erne on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers, by which time it was at Maghaberry.  Moving to West Raynham in 1943, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1944.

2756 Squadron

Formed as No 756 Squadron at Eglington on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  On the 6 February, a detachment from the squadron of 36 gunners led by Pilot Officer Gough arrived at Palembang, attached to No 232 Squadron. The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1944, by which time it was based at Coningsby.

2757 Squadron

Formed as No 757 Squadron at Nutts Corner on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942, becoming a Field Squadron in March 1943  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, becoming an Armoured Car Unit in Unit in July 1944, moving to the continent in August, becoming together with 2717 Squadron and an RAF Air Technical Intelligence (ATI)  Team the first RAF unit to enter Rouen, before taking another ATI Team into Bayeux and becoming the first British unit into Trouville.  It later moved to Antwerp and served on the Leopold Canal before moving, in 1945, into Germany, serving at Wunstorf and Bonn in 1945, Gutersloh in 1946 and Celle in 1947, being disbanded by being renumbered No 3 Squadron on 21 August 1947 at Gutersloh.  During the North-West European campaign one member of the squadron was awarded the Croix de Guerre and four others were mentioned in despatches.

2758 Squadron

Formed as No 758 Squadron at Aberporth on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Regiment Depot in 1942, converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and during the anti-Diver operations of 1944 was based at Foulness.  It disbanded in August 1945.

2759 Squadron

Formed as No 759 Squadron at Andover on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Converting to the Field squadron role in March 1943, it joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  It was transferred to  ACSEA, arriving in Bombay in October 1944, initially being deployed to Secunderabad for acclimatisation.  It was then deployed to Chittagong, Chiringa, Meiktila, Toungoo, Penang, Singapore and Tengah, where it disbanded in April 1946.

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2760 Squadron

Formed as No 760 Squadron at Bodorgan on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Sumburgh in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in June 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in August 1944, becoming a Rifle squadron in December. The squadron converted back to the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945 and moved onto the continent in February, serving at Ostend and Altona.  The squadron disbanded in December 1946 in Hamburg with one member of the squadron being mentioned in despatches.

2761 Squadron

Formed as No 761 Squadron at Bottisham on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in June 1943 During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Southend, disbanding in April 1945.

2762 Squadron

Formed as No 762 Squadron at Cardiff on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  It was later based at Beaulieu and Manston, disbanding in July 1945.

2763 Squadron

Formed as No 763 Squadron at Doncaster on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in August 1945 at Wyton, having previously been at Lympne.

2764 Squadron

Formed as No 764 Squadron at Perton on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Becoming a Field squadron in October 1942 and a Light Anti-Aircraft unit in May 1943, it disbanded in June 1943.

2765 Squadron

Formed as No 765 Squadron at Gatwick on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and became a Rifle squadron in October 1944.  It moved onto the continent in February 1945, initially serving at St Omer. It later moved into Germany serving at Fuhlsbuttel, Schleswig Holstein, Flensburg, Sylt, Grove and Eggebek, where it disbanded in August 1946.

2766 Squadron

Formed as No 766 Squadron at Kidsdale on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Brooklands and disbanded in October 1945.

2767 Squadron

Formed as No 767 Squadron at Manorbier on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  During 1944, it was based at Exeter and Hastings, disbanding in October 1945.  One member of the squadron was awarded a Mention in Despatches.

2768 Squadron

Formed as No 768 Squadron at Odiham on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943. On 1 April 1943, the squadron represented the RAF in it's 25th Anniversary celebrations by mounting the guard at St James's Palace.  It became a Rifle squadron in December 1944 and converted back to the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945.  Moving to the continent in February 1945, initially to Melbroek and then Volkel before arriving at Gilze Rijen, where it disbanded in October 1945.

2769 Squadron

Formed as No 769 Squadron at Old Sarum on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  In April 1943, the squadron was based at West Malling and whilst one of its Beaverette Mk III armoured cars was patrolling, a German Fw190 landed on the runway.  The crew immediately blocked the path of the aircraft and captured the pilot.  Whilst taking their prisoner back, a second Fw190 landed but was able to turn around and attempt a take off.  LAC Sharback, the commander, opened fire causing the aircraft to run off the runway and catch fire, the pilot being thrown clear but injured.   The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in June 1943 and disbanded in October 1945.  One member of the squadron was awarded the BEM.

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2770 Squadron

Formed as No 770 Squadron at Sawbridgeworth on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 and in order to prepare for the invasion, their CO, set up a mock Landing Craft - Tank at West Raynham, on which they were able to practice disembarkation procedures.  becoming a Rifle squadron in September 1944 and  moving to the continent in October, initially serving at Strasbourg, Mutzig and in the Ardennes before moving to Krefeld in 1945 and Gutersloh in 1946, where it was disbanded by being renumbered  No 56 Squadron on 21 August 1947.  During its time in Europe, one member of the squadron was mentioned in despatches.

2771 Squadron

Formed as No 771 Squadron at Cleave on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 converting to a Field squadron in April.  In November 1942, it took part in Operation Torch arriving in one of the follow-on convoys, initially being deployed to protect No 326 (Bomber) Wing at Setif airfield along with No 4090 LAA Flight. 

As the advance eastwards continued, the squadron (with 4090 Flight) moved Canrobert to Oulmene and then across the Nementcha Mountains to Zribet Hamed, where they established a base for night operations.  In February 1943, the Germans attacked the US forces in the Kasserine Pass and where close to the RAF landing ground of No 326 Wing.  Group Captain Laurence Sinclair ordered his aircraft to leave but he them formed his ground staff and Regiment personnel into a defensive force, to ensure that the landing ground did not fall into German hands.  During its time in North Africa personnel of the squadron were mentioned in despatches twice.

For the invasion of Sicily, the squadron was allocated to HQ North African Tactical Air Forces.  It moved to Italy in December 1943, initially serving at Naples, and Rimini, but in April 1944, the squadron was attached to the US 5th Army and deployed to man a section of the front line at Cassino. It joined Land Forces Adriatic in December 1944 and was immediately deployed to Greece, where it was involved in the defence of Hassani airfield.  Its armoured car flight was part of the relief force sent from Hassani to Kifissia to support the AHQ under attack by Greek ELAS partisans, unfortunately the relief force was too late to prevent many of the HQ staff and defenders being captured.  During the operation to clear Athens the squadron operated under the command of 139 Infantry Brigade.

In February 1945 the squadron moved to Yugoslavia and was attached to the Raiding Support Regiment (a special forces unit composed of infantry and artillery, as well as elements from other Army Corps incliding RASC and RAMC) providing close support for their attacks along the Yugoslav coast, serving at Prykos and Zadar.  Some members of the squadron had been trained in parachuting and became part of a Special Duties Section known as Celyforce (after its CO Squadron Leader Cely-Travilian).  Its role was to support RAF Air Liaison Teams, but Tito's refusal to permit their use resulted in Celyforce being attached to the Special Boat Section.

It later moved to Vienna in Austria. During this period members of the squadron received one BEM and eight Mentions in Despatches.  In March 1946 it moved to Palestine, becoming a Rifle squadron at the same time.  It served at Ramat David and St Jean, disbanding in April 1946.

2772 Squadron

Formed as No 772 Squadron at Towyn on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and served at Warmwell.  The squadron disbanded in April 1945.

2773 Squadron

Formed as No 773 Squadron at York on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  On 1 April 1943, the squadron represented the RAF in it's 25th Anniversary celebrations by mounting the guard at Buckingham Palace.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, moving to the continent in August 1944, to be based at Eindhoven, still being there during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  The squadron disbanded at Hildesheim in December 1945.  During it time in Europe, one member of the squadron was mentioned in despatches.

2774 Squadron

Formed as No 774 Squadron at Longkesh on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in October 1942.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at St Leonards on Sea and disbanded in April 1945.

2775 Squadron

Formed as No 775 Squadron at Newtonards on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in October 1942 and disbanded in October 1943, by which time it was stationed at Middle Wallop.

2776 Squadron

Formed as No 776 Squadron at Helensburgh on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. The squadron later moved to Swinderby, converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and to the Rifle role in October 1944, disbanding in February 1945.

2777 Squadron

Formed as No 777 Squadron at Evanton on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Converting to the Field squadron role in March 1943, it joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, becoming an Armoured Car Unit in July, moving to the continent in Augustbeing based at Beny-sur-Mer until moving to Grimbergen, where it was during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  It later moved to Hamburg, Fassberg, Achmer and in 1946, Celle.  The squadron was disbanded by being renumbered No 4 Squadron on 21 August 1947.  During its time in Europe, one member of the squadron was awarded the BEM and another was mentioned in despatches.

2778 Squadron

Formed as No 778 Squadron at Jurby on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Manston in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Maidstone, where it was disbanded in May 1945.

2779 Squadron

Formed as No 779 Squadron at Netheravon on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to North Weald in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in April 1945.  It also served at Helston at some point in the war.

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2780 Squadron

Formed as No 780 Squadron at Penrhos on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Regiment Depot in 1942, converting to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanding in April 1945, by which time it was located at Smith's Lawn.

2781 Squadron

Formed as No 781 Squadron at Peterborough on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It become a Field Squadron in March 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  It become an Armoured Car Unit in Unit in July 1944 and moved onto the continent in August, initially at Maas and on the Wilhelmina Canal before moving into Germany, where it served at Hannover. Achmer, Schleswig Holstein, Sylt and Lubeck, where it disbanded in July 1946.  During its time in Northern Europe members of the squadron were awarded two MCs (Flying Officer John Wild and Flying Officer John Millar - see below), three BEMs and eight Mentions in Despatches.

Citation for the award of the Military Cross

"Flying Officer John Reginald Bawater WILD (134955). R.A.F.V.R., Royal Air Force Regiment.

In October, 1944, this officer was in charge of a forward observation post, consisting of one troop of reconnaissance cars, on the south bank of the Wilhelmina Canal, when a warning was received that a patrol of the enemy was working across the canal towards him. Flying Officer Wild immediately set out to meet the oncoming patrol, covered by two of his men. He encountered four of the enemy, and although under heavy fire, threw a hand grenade at them. Flying Officer Wild then worked, his way round to the enemy's flank and threw a further grenade which wounded a German officer and two men. He then advanced on the German position, killing the officer with his revolver, but the other men escaped, leaving their weapons behind. Flying Officer Wild, accompanied by others, continued the search but the remainder of the enemy patrol had escaped across the canal. This officer, during the whole of the  operation in this sector, displayed courage and skill of the highest order.  He personally accounted for at least six of the enemy by sniping and at all times set a magnificent example to his men."

(London Gazette - 9 February 1945)

Citation for the award of the Military Cross

"Flying Officer John Still MILLAR (137840), No. 2781 Squadron, Royal Air Force Regiment.

One day in April, 1945, a troop of reconnaissance cars commanded toy Flying Officer Millar was ordered to patrol round the perimeter of the airfield at Osnabruck, where a working party was on the air strip and three flights of a squadron of the Royal Air Force Regiment were ordered to neutralise enemy fire which might be directed at them from beyond the Ems Weser Canal. Two flights reached the canal bank when spandaus and snipers fired at one flight, killing an officer and an airman and seriously wounding 4 others and pining the flight down. Flying Officer Millar went to the scene with his troop and took charge. In spite of the proximity of the enemy, he succeeded in removing the dead and wounded in the reconnaissance cars and gave sufficient covering fire to the remainder of the flight to enable them to withdraw. All this time his troop was under concentrated fire from the enemy at a range of under 100 yards. This officer displayed coolness, courage and initiative whilst organising this withdrawal and without his aid this flight would undoubtedly have suffered considerably more casualties."

 (London Gazette  - 5 June 1945)

2782 Squadron

Formed as No 782 Squadron at Manby on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1945, by which time it has moved to St Eval..

2783 Squadron

Formed as No 783 Squadron at Upavon on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and disbanded in April 1945, by which time it was located at Swingate.

2784 Squadron

Formed as No 784 Squadron at West Freugh on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and to the Rifle role in October 1944, by which time it was located at Dyce.  It disbanded in February 1945.

2785 Squadron

Formed as No 785 Squadron at Chivenor on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1944.

2786 Squadron

Formed as No 786 Squadron at Boscombe Down on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Netheravon in 1943, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May.  It became a Rifle squadron in October 1944  and moved to the continent in April 1945, serving at Ghent, Hamelin and Hamburg, before moving to Uetersen in 1946.  It was disbanded by being renumbered  No 51 Squadron on 21 August 1947 at Luneburg.

2787 Squadron

Formed as No 787 Squadron at Swanage on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers, by which time the squadron was at Chester.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and disbanded in April 1945 at Martlesham Heath.

2788 Squadron

Formed as No 788 Squadron at South Cerney on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers, by which time it was based at the RAF Depot, becoming a Field squadron in March.  In November 1942, it took part in Operation Torch arriving in one of the follow-on convoys.  However shortly before disembarking at  Algiers, their ship, the liner Scythia was torpedoed, although it remained afloat and eventually docked in port.  It was initially assigned to protect 322 (Fighter) Wing at La Calle (Bone) along with No 4089 LAA Flight.  The rear echelon of the squadron arrived aboard the liner Strathallan, which was hit by a torpedo on 21 December.  During the ensuing panic Plt Off Dodd of the squadron and LAC Turner of No 2825 Squadron, rescued an Army officer and soldier, who had fallen into the sea.  Plt Off Dodd was awarded the MBE and LAC Turner the BEM.

In early 1943 a new landing ground was established at Lac Fetzara and this squadron and 4089 Flight where transferred from La Calle to defend it.  At the end of February 1943, the squadron was tasked to relieve 2721 Squadron at Cap Serrat, but a German counter attack brought them into close proximity of this station and orders were given for its withdrawal.  The Navy were able to remove the vital equipment by sea, whilst 2721 and 4092 provided close support to the withdrawal and 2788 and 4089 provided the rear guard cover. 

In March 1943, the squadron was attached to 38th Infantry Brigade, taking over a sector of the line from the London Irish, whilst its armoured cars joined the 56th Reconnaissance Regiment and the 25 pounder field guns of its support flight were attached to the 67th Field Regiment..  Between 6 - 12 May the squadron was part of  'S' Force, a group established to locate and secure enemy equipment and personnel in the Bizerta and Tunis areas.  During its time in North Africa personnel of the squadron were awarded an MC and a Mentioned in Despatches.

The squadron arrived in Italy in December 1943, serving at Cassino but in July 1944, it was allocated to Operation 'Anvil' (the invasion of Southern France), landing beaches between Cannes and St Tropez.  As little enemy opposition was expected, the squadron was split into three smaller units, each tasked with occupying a designated enemy airfield and gathering any intelligence there.  This plan worked at Ramatouelle, near St Tropez and Sisteron (100 km inland) but at Valence (200 km inland) the force of two armoured cars and a truck carrying a further 12 men under the command of Flying Officer Mead ran into strong German opposition resulting in the loss of the two amoured cars and several other casualties.  The force was eventually surrounded and captured, but most were able to escape from a train taking them north and had rejoined their unit within days.

The squadron then returned to Ravenna in Italy, where it replaced No 2721 Squadron, which was then attached to the 27th Lancers and it remained attached as the Regiment captured Fusignamo and advanced towards the River Po.  During this period its members were awarded one OBE, one MBE, one MC and five Mentions in Despatches.  In March 1945 it moved to Palestine, becoming a Rifle squadron at the same time, serving at Ramleh and Ein Shemer. The squadron was disbanded by being renumbered No 58 Squadron on 8 June 1947

2789 Squadron

Formed as No 789 Squadron at Montrose on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in October 1944 at Tangmere.

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2790 Squadron

Formed as No 790 Squadron at Worcester on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in October 1944.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Merston.

2791 Squadron

Formed as No 791 Squadron at Cranfield on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943  and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in August 1944.  Converting to the Rifle squadron role in December 1944 and the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945, it moved to the continent in February 1945, initially being being deployed to Lille, before moving to Celle.  However, it was soon on the move again, to Norway, being deployed to Stavanger and Sola.  For its service in Norway two members of the squadron were awarded the King Haakon Medal.  It returned to the UK, disbanding at Folkingham in December 1945.

2792 Squadron

Formed as No 792 Squadron at Kidlington on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Friston and disbanded in October 1945.

2793 Squadron

Formed as No 793 Squadron at Grantham on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Detling and disbanded in December 1945.  In February 1942, AC2 Scott became the first RAF Regiment gunner to be involved in the rescue of aircrew from a crashed aircraft, when he rescued the crew of an aircraft that had crashed near Grantham, for which he was awarded a Mention in Despatches.

2794 Squadron

Formed as No 794 Squadron at Watchfleld on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  It moved to the continent on D + 12, being initially based at Brussels but had moved to Ophoven by the time the airfield was attacked during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945). It later moved to Schleswig Holstein, Husum, Vandel and finally Flensburg, where it disbanded in December 1945.

2795 Squadron

Formed as No 795 Squadron at Bovingdon on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943, disbanding in October 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Foulness.

2796 Squadron

Formed as No 796 Squadron at Ronaldsway on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Eastchurch in 1943, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in October 1945.  In late 1943 the squadron was operating at Hurn when an RAF aircraft crashed and burst into flames, LAC Giles and AC Waites managed to rescue the crew and both were awarded the BEM for their bravery.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Allhallows.

2797 Squadron

Formed as No 797 Squadron at North Luffenham on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in April 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Littlestone.

2798 Squadron

Formed as No 798 Squadron at Church Lawford on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942, becoming a Field squadron in March 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 and landed on Omaha beach in Normandy on D+4, being deployed to Rennes under the command of the US 3rd Army (General Patton).  It became a Rifle squadron in July and moved to Paris, being the first British unit to enter the city.  It later moved to Nijmegen, Brussels, Wamel, Waal, Walcheren, Cortenborg, Bastogne before moving into Germany where it served at Kiel, and List in 1945.  It moved to Flensburg in 1946 and Wahn in 1947, but it disbanded on 21 August 1947 by being renumbered  No 59 Squadron  at Wunstorf.  Personnel of the squadron received one MM (see below), two Croix de Guerre and one Mention in Despatches.

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"1087956 Leading Aircraftman Thomas Gwyn DAVIES, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, R.A.F. Regiment.

In October, 1944, Leading Aircraftman Davies's unit was at Wamel and was given a section of the front line to hold. The enemy, in strength, were on the opposite bank of the River Waal, roughly one kilometre away. One day orders were given to concentrate full fire power on a factory site known to contain valuable enemy equipment. Artillery support was to be given and it was expected that counter-fire would be received. At 15.00 hours, the bombardment of the enemy position commenced. Shortly afterwards a bomb from one of the mortars failed to leave the muzzle completely and was liable to fall to the ground. Realising the grave danger, Leading Aircraftman Davies, with great presence of mind and complete disregard of his own safety, grasped the bomb and threw it into a pond at the rear of the position. He then immediately continued to fire the mortar and so enabled his team to complete a rapid attack and to withdraw before counter-fire was brought to bear against them. This airman's courage and sense of duty saved the lives of his colleagues and enabled an important enemy objective to be destroyed."

(London Gazette – 27 March 1945)

2799 Squadron

Formed as No 799 Squadron at Grangemouth on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943, disbanding in October 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Hawkinge.

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2800 Squadron

Formed as No 800 Squadron at Pembrey on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Colerne in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 and moved to the continent in August, being deployed to Merville.  It later moved to Maldagem and Evere, where it was based during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  It later moved to Gilze Rijen and Dedelsdorf, where it disbanded in December 1945.  Two members of the squadron were mentioned in despatches.

2801 Squadron

Formed as No 801 Squadron at Stornoway on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Northolt in late 1942 or early 1943, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and also served on the Isle of Wight before disbanding in April 1945.

2802 Squadron

Formed as No 802 Squadron at Cardington on 19 December 1941 having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.    It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  Transferred to ACSEA in October 1944, it arrived in Bombay i January 1945.  Initially deployed to Agartala, it made further moves to Dwhala, Kalawya, Rangoon, Panang and finally Kuala Lumper, where it disbanded in February 1946.  One member of the squadron was awarded the BEM.

2803 Squadron

Formed as No 803 Squadron at Sealand on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Peterhead to 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and during the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Friston.  The squadron disbanded in October 1945.

2804 Squadron

Formed as No 804 Squadron at Cosford on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Halton in 1942 and converting to the  Field role in March 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, becoming an Armoured Car Unit in Unit in July and moving to the continent in September, being deployed to St Criox and the Ardennes before entering Germany.  Here it initially deployed to Wunstorf and then Gatow, where it disbanded  in June 1946.  Members of the squadron were awarded one MC (see below), two Croix de Guerre and one Mention in Despatches.

Citation for the award of the Military Cross

"Acting Flight Lieutenant Walter Ross JAY (109231), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve.

Flight 'Lieutenant Jay has commanded an armoured flight for eleven months and 'has been actively engaged in conflict with the enemy since August, 1944. From 3rd-12th April, 1945, his flight was acting as an armoured reconnaissance unit to a special force whose speedy advance was only made possible by his determined and efficient handling of the flight. On 8th April, 1945, Flight Lieutenant Jay was ordered to carry out a reconnaissance with a troop of armoured cars which necessitated proceeding between two strongly held pockets of resistance.  He was frequently under fire and once had to join battle with the enemy, giving covering fire to an American detachment in difficulties. His determination, courage and complete disregard of personal danger, enabled the force to gain its objective without casualties.  The operation resulted in the capture of the entire designing staff of the Focke Wulf Aircraft Company, together with many valuable secret documents."

(London Gazette - 4 January 1946)

2805 Squadron

Formed as No 805 Squadron at Hawkinge on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and then to the Rifle role in October 1944.  It moved to the continent in January 1945, being deployed to Ghent, the Ems/Weser Canal, Osnabruck, Achmer, Luneburg and finally Schleswig Holstein, where it disbanded in June 1946. 

2806 Squadron

Formed as No 806 Squadron at Cranwell on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Converting to the Field role in March 1943, it joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 and became an Armoured Car squadron in  July, moving to the continent the same month.  It was deployed to Carpiquet, Beauvais, Melsbroek, Escaut, the Albert Canal, Eindhoven, Luneburg and finally Schleswig Holstein, where it disbanded in April 1946.  Members of the squadron were awarded one GM, one Croix de Guerre and five Mentions in Despatches.

2807 Squadron

Formed as No 807 Squadron at Yatesbury on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and then to the Rifle role in  October 1944, moving to the continent in February 1945.  It was deployed to Eindhoven, Wunstorf, and finally Wahn, where it disbanded in April 1946.  Members of the squadron were awarded one Croix de Guerre and one Mention in Despatches.

2808 Squadron

Formed as No 808 Squadron at Polebrook on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and later operated from Kingston, disbanding in October 1944.

2809 Squadron

Formed as No 809 Squadron at Snaith on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Wittering in 1942, it became a Field squadron in October.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  Although part of the initial invasion force the squadron did not land on Juno beach until D +1 and was then deployed to St Croix followed by Ellon, Carpiquet, and Volkel, where it was based during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  It later moved to Celle, Tondern and Schleswig Holstein, where it disbanded in November 1945.  One member of the squadron was mentioned in despatches.

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2810 Squadron

Formed as No 810 Squadron at Pocklington on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943  and was transferred to ACSEA in October 1944, arriving in Bombay in January 1945.  Initially deployed to Agartala, it then moved to Chaklala, where it underwent Parachute training and moved to Calcutta.  It moved into Singapore after its liberation and was allocated to Operation 'Mastiff'.  It later served in Java and Sumatra before finally moving to Hong Kong, disbanding at  Changi in April 1947.  Whilst serving in the Far East, one member of the squadron was awarded the MM.

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"630123 Temporary Corporal Lionel Dennis Squire GROOME, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, No. 2810 Squadron, Royal Air Force Regiment.

Corporal Groome, a nursing orderly, was parachuted into Sourabaya with a Medical Officer and a P.O.W. Contact Officer, on operation " Mastiff." The party was well received but on 19th September, 1945, the Dutch hoisted the Dutch flag and .this caused a riot among the population. This was eventually quelled after the flag was lowered.  On 28th October, following various incidents, the British party became the object of all types of small arms fire. The party withdrew to an hotel which was organised as a defensive position with the aid of a platoon of Rajput Rifles. Sniping became intermittent and on 2gth October, the Indonesians made a frontal fierce attack on the hotel, and the party was forced to withdraw from the front of the hotel. Casualties were sustained by I.O.R's. and Corporal Groome rendered first aid under fire. Later, when a bren gunner became a casualty, Corporal Groome, although a nursing orderly, took over the gun and handled, it with such efficiency that he considerably helped to repel the Indonesians, who were prevented from reaching the upper floors of the hotel. Corporal Groome then proceeded to render first aid to the wounded, and, while so doing, was taken prisoner. He was released on 3rd November, 1945."

(London Gazette - 17 May 1946)

2811 Squadron

Formed as No 811 Squadron at Molesworth on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943  and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, converting to the Rifle role in September.  It moved to the continent in November 1944, being deployed to Mons, Malmedy, Laroche, Morville, the Ardennes, Weikersheim, Scheede and finally Ghent, where it disbanded in March 1946.  Members of the squadron were awarded one Order of Leopold and three Croix de Guerre

2812 Squadron

Formed as No 812 Squadron at Holme on Spalding Moor on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to CoIishall in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in August 1944, converting to the Rifle role in December. and the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945.  It moved to the continent in February 1945, being deployed to Ostend and Epinoy, where it disbanded in November 1945.

2813 Squadron

Formed as No 813 Squadron at Thurleigh on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Middle Wallop in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Merston and one member of the squadron was Mentioned in Despatches.

2814 Squadron

Formed as No 814 Squadron at Stapleford on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943, being deployed to Eastbourne to counter the Luftwaffe's 'tip and run' raids. It joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, converting to the Rifle role in September 1944 and moved to the continent in May 1945, being deployed to Antwerp, Eindhoven, Wesel, Hamm, Hamelin, Scharfoldendorf and finally Hildesheim, where it disbanded  in July 1946.

2815 Squadron

Formed as No 815 Squadron at Atcham on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers. Moving to Kenley in 1942, it converted to the Field role in October and the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943  It also served at Merryfield before disbanding in October 1944.

2816 Squadron

Formed as No 816 Squadron at Tempsford on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Converting to the  Field role in April 1942, it joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944 and converted to the Rifle role July.  It moved onto the continent in August 1944, initially being deployed to St Croix-sur-Mer and bythe end of 1944 had served at Rouen, St Pol, Moerkerke, on the Leopold Canal, Damme, Grimbergenand and Woerndrecht/Deurne, where it was based during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  Further moves moves east took it to Antwerp, Ahlhorn, Hustedt and Celle, where it disbanded in June 1946.  Members of the squadron were awarded one MC (Flying Officer Norman Page), one MM (Flight Sergeant Albert Greening), two Mentions in Despatches, one Order of the Crown, one Order of Leopold, and four Croix de Guerre.

Citation for the award of the Military Cross

"Flying Officer Norman John PAGE (137852), R.A.F.V.R., Royal Air Force Regiment.

One afternoon in September, 1944, in an attempt to save 20 men of a Light Anti-Aircraft unit, Avho were surrounded, the rifle flight under the command of Flying Officer Page twice engaged greatly superior forces of the enemy, who were in well concealed positions in a wood N.E. of Vaeke, south of the Leopold Canal. During the second engagement, the flight was beset on three sides by heavy enemy machine gun fire and fairly heavy mortar fire taut, by outstanding skill and leadership, Flying Officer Page withdrew his flight without loss, inflicting casualties on the enemy. For about 0:4 days Flying Officer Page's flight occupied the left flank of a forward defence locality at Moerkerke. During this period he was tireless in his devotion to duty.  He frequently led patrols to enable mortar fire to be brought to bear on the enemy and, by night, he directed counter measures against enemy patrols. Flying Officer Page at all times justified the trust and disciplined response of his men by his dash and energy. He directed skilfully the .tasks allotted to the flight and, although the enemy was at all times superior in numbers and fire' power, the operations were carried out without loss, while casualties were inflicted on the enemy.

(London Gazette - 9 February 1945)

Citation for the award of the Military Medal

"519679 Flight Sergeant Albert Ernest GREENING, R.A.F., Royal Air Force Regiment.

For about 14 days this non-commissioned officer was a Detachment Commander in a 3 inch mortar flight located in Moerkerke and close to the enemy lines. The detachment was .under continual fire from enemy mortars and snipers and was subjected to periodical shelling. On one occasion the church tower at Moerkerke, from which Flight Sergeant Greening was observing, was hit and set on fire, but he completed the shoot and escaped from his observation post. The accuracy of the fire he directed undoubtedly ' caused the enemy to lose the initiative in an area where our own positions were very thinly held. The offensive spirit and good shooting of Flight Sergeant Greening's detachment successfully discouraged the enemy ' from preparing for a series of local attacks."

(London Gazette - 9 February 1945)

2817 Squadron

Formed as No 817 Squadron at Bottesford on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  The squadron crossed the Channel in LCT46, which was attacked by a German coastal battery, killing some members of the squadron and wounding others, but the survivors and dead were taken off by LCT43 before LCT46 sank.  They eventually landed on Juno beach on D + 2, being deployed to Grange-Sur-Mer and later Beauvais, Brussels, Eindhoven and Heesch, where it was based during Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  Its final move was to Uetersen, where it disbanded at  in December 1945.

2818 Squadron

Formed as No 818 Squadron at Theale on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  Becoming a Rifle squadron in October 1944, it disbanded in April 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Folkestone.

2819 Squadron

Formed as No 819 Squadron at Chelveston on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  Although part of the initial invasion force the squadron did not land on Juno beach until D + 1, being deployed to St Croix-sur-Mer and then Beny-sur-Mer, Cristot, Brussels, Eindhoven and Heesch, where it was based at the time of Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  It continued its move East in 1945, moving to Luneburg, Kastrup, Schleswig Holstein and Lubeck, where it disbanded in December 1945.

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2820 Squadron

Formed as No 820 Squadron at Millom on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers, by which time it was located at Atcham.  Moving to Kenley in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in April 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Southend.  One member of the squadron were awarded a BEM and another was Mentioned in Despatches.

2821 Squadron

Formed as No 821 Squadron at Perth on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Thorney Island in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and then the Rifle role in May 1945, disbanding in October 1945

2822 Squadron

Formed as No 822 Squadron at Colerne on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Carlisle in 1942, it converted to the Field role in March 1943 and in May 1944 was sent to reinforce the defences at Lagens in the Azores at the time of a German attack on the islands seemed likely.  It returned to the UK in October 1944 and became a Rifle squadron in January 1945, moving to the continent in May 1945.  Here it was deployed to Copenhagen, Aarhus, Vandel and finally Gutersloh, where it disbanded  in April 1946.

2823 Squadron

Formed as No 823 Squadron at Derby on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944  It converted to the Rifle role in December 1944 and to the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945, moving to the continent in February.  Initially deployed to Amiens, it subsequently moved to Brussels, Evere, Rheine, Fuhlsbuttel and Stade, where it disbanded in May 1946.

2824 Squadron

Formed as No 824 Squadron at Fairoaks on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Biggin Hill in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  It became a Rifle squadron in December 1944 but converted back to the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945, moving to the continent in February. Initially deployed to Vitry it subsequently moved to Gilze Rijen, where it disbanded in December 1945.  Members of the squadron were awarded an MBE and a Mention in Despatches.

2825 Squadron

Formed as No 825 Squadron at Booker on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Duxford in 1942, it became a Field squadron in May.  In November 1942, it took part in Operation Torch arriving in one of the follow-on convoys, initially being deployed to La Maison Blache airfield to protect 323 (Fighter) Wing, along with No 4088 LAA Flight.  In early December it was re-assigned to No 324 Wing at its new location at Souk el Arba.  The rear echelon of the squadron arrived aboard the liner Strathallan, which was hit by a torpedo on 21 December.  During the ensuing panic Plt Off Dodd of No 2788 squadron and LAC Turner of No 2825 Squadron, rescued an Army officer and soldier, who had fallen into the sea.  Plt Off Dodd was awarded the MBE and LAC Turner the BEM. During its time in North Africa one other member of the squadron was also mentioned in despatches.

For the invasion of Sicily, the squadron was allocated to HQ North African Tactical Air Forces.  It moved over to Italy in December 1943, serving at Naples, Amendola, Altamura and Bari.  In April 1944, the squadron was attached to the US 5th Army and deployed to man a section of the front line at Cassino.  In June 1944 the squadron joined the Balkan Air Force as part of No 1321 Wing.  Together with No 2932 Squadron it underwent commado training on the island of Vis in order for it to join Land Forces Adriatic, with whom it undertook a number of amphibious operations along the Yugoslav coast.  It later moved to Split and in November 1944 it occupied Dubrovnik, remaining until January 1945.  In February the squadron was part of the force which landed in Yugoslavia and captured the airfield at Prykos.  Later still it moved to Klagenfurt and Schwechat in Austria converting to the Rifle role in March 1946 and disbanded in April.  From December 1943 members of the squadron were awarded one BEM and five Mentions in Despatches.

2826 Squadron

Formed as No 826 Squadron at Cambridge on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Hawkinge in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  It converted to the Rifle role in December 1944 and back to the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945.  It moved to the continent in February 1945, initially being deployed to Courtrai and later Lubeck and Flensburg, where it disbanded in December 1945.  One member of the squadron was mentioned in despatches.

2827 Squadron

Formed as No 827 Squadron at Castle Bromwich on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Wittering in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, becoming a Rifle squadron in July, it moved to the continent the same month.  Initially deployed to Cristot, it subsequently moved to St Clair, the Wilhelmina Canal, Helmond, and by 1945 was in Volkel.  Further moves took it to Eindhoven, Bergden, Everson, Mettinggen, Schleswig Holstein, Lubeck, Kiel, Vaerlose, Hamburg and Gutersloh.  It was disbanded by being renumbered No 60 Squadron on 21 August 1947 at Hamburg Altona.  Members of the squadron were awarded one Croix de Guerre and a Mention in Desptaches.

2828 Squadron

Formed as No 828 Squadron at Honeybourne on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in August 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Detling.

2829 Squadron

Formed as No 829 Squadron at Chipping Warden on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and became a Field squadron in March 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, becoming a Rifle squadron in September, and moving to the continent in November, initially being deployed to Gilze Rijen and subsequently Maas and Grave.  Moving to Celle in 1945, Lubeck in 1946 and Buckeburg in 1947, the squadron was disbanded by being renumbered  No 61 Squadron on 21 August 1947 at Lubeck.

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2830 Squadron

Formed as No 830 Squadron at Clyffe Pypard on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Southend in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943.  In May 1945, it was deployed to Norway, serving at Tromso, Bardufoss and Fornebu, where it disbanded in October 1945.  Members of the squadron were awarded one MBE, two Mentions in Despatches and two King Haakon Medals.

2831 Squadron

Formed as No 831 Squadron at Inverness on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in August 1944.   It became a Rifle squadron in September 1944 and moved to the continent in October, intially being deployed to Epinoy.  The squadron subsequently moved to Sancourt, Dunkirk, where it took part in the siege of the town, Achmer and  Detmold, where it disbanded in March 1946.  Three members of the squadron were awarded BEMs (Corporal Whyte, LAC Northmore and LAC Webb)

Citation for the awards of the British Empire Medal

"623786 Corporal Josiah Weir WHYTE, Royal Air Force Regiment,

1249681 Leading Aircraftman John Leonard NORTHMORE, Royal Air Force Regiment.

1612216 Leading Aircraftman Stanley George WEBB, Royal Air Force Regiment.

On l0th May, 1945, R.E. personnel were engaged in clearing enemy mines on the far side of the canal adjoining an airfield. Some of the mines exploded, wounding several of the soldiers. Corporal Whyte, together with Leading Aircraftman Northmore and Webb, immediately crossed to the far bank with blankets, stretchers and medical equipment, although they were fully aware of the danger as the ditch which contained loo mines was on fire. They rendered first aid to a wounded Sapper who was lying in an exposed position and, whilst <so doing, all three were injured by the explosion of further mines. Nevertheless, these airmen remained with the wounded man and manoeuvred him into a safe position. These airmen showed a complete disregard for their personal safety and unselfish devotion to duty after they had been injured."

(London Gazette - 18 December 1945)

2832 Squadron

Formed as No 832 Squadron at Honiley on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in April 1945, having also served at Shoreham and Tangmere.

2833 Squadron

Formed as No 833 Squadron at Hadley on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Driffield in 1943, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1944.

2834 Squadron

Formed as No 834 Squadron at Wigtown on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Wittering in 1943, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  Although part of the initial invasion force the squadron did not land on Juno beach until D + I, initially being deployed to Bazenville and becoming the first RAF Regiment unit to see action in France.  It subsequently moved to Carpiquet, Cristot, Boussey, St Andre and was serving at Volkel at the time of Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  Further moves took it to Kastrup and Flensburg, where it disbanded in November 1945.  One member of squadron was mentioned in despatches.

2835 Squadron

Formed as No 835 Squadron at Woodvale on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in April 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Hooe.

2836 Squadron

Formed as No 836 Squadron at St. Angelo on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to West Raynham in 1943, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and later served at Swanton Morley being disbanded in July 1944.

2837 Squadron

Formed as No 837 Squadron at Thruxton on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and was transferred to ACSEA in August 1944., arriving in Bombay in October.  Initially deployed to Calcutta, it made further moves to Chittagong, Ramu, Cox’s Bazaar, Ramree Island, Madras, Singapore, Sumatra and Medan, where it disbanded in April 1946.

2838 Squadron

Formed as No 838 Squadron at Dalcross on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Leighton Buzzard in 1942, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in August 1944 it becoming a Rifle squadron in December and converting back to the Light Anti Aircraft role in January 1945.  It moved to the continent in February 1945 serving at Melsbroek before disbanding at Gutersloh in December 1945.

2839 Squadron

Formed as No 839 Squadron at Marston Moor on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Southend.  Relocated to Stapleford Tawney in late 1944, the squadron suffered the loss of an officer and 10 non-commissioned personnel in January 1945, when one of their lecture rooms was hit by a V2 rocket.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in August 1945.

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2840 Squadron

Formed as No 840 Squadron at Ossington on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943, disbanding in August 1945.  During the anti-Diver operations of 1944 it was based at Bradwell Bay.

2841 Squadron

Formed as No 841 Squadron at Benbecula on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Leighton Buzzard in 1942,the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in June 1943 and disbanded in February 1945.

2842 Squadron

Formed as No 842 Squadron at Tiree on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Binbrook in 1943, the squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and disbanded in July 1944.  One member of the squadron was Mentioned in Despatches.

2843 Squadron

Formed as No 843 Squadron at Thame on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It became a Field squadron in March 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944.  It became a Rifle squadron in September 1944 and moved to the continent in November.  It was initially deployed to Maldegem, before further moves took it to Capelle, Gilze Rijen, Grimbergen, Delden, Scheuen, Dedelstorf and Ahlhorn, where it disbanded in August 1946.

2844 Squadron

Formed as No 844 Squadron at Barrow on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in 1942, becoming a Field squadron in October.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and became a Rifle squadron in October 1944.  It moved to the continent in May 1945, being deployed to Luneburg, where it disbanded in March 1946.

2845 Squadron

Formed as No 845 Squadron at Drem on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  It moved to the RAF Depot in  1943 and converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May.  The squadron joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in April 1944, moving to the continent in September as a Rifle squadron, initially being deployed to Lisieux and subsequently  Epinoy, Vitry and Gilze Rijen, where it became involved in Operation 'Bodenplatte' (the Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields on 1 January 1945).  One further move took it to Delmenhorst , where it disbanded in December 1945.

2846 Squadron

Formed as No 846 Squadron at Leuchars on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943 and transferred to ACSEA in October 1944, arriving in Bombay in January 1945.  After acclimatisation at Secunderabad, it moved to Santa Cruz, into Malaya and the Singapore disbanding at Seletar in March 1946.

2847 Squadron

Formed as No 847 Squadron at Llandow on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in May 1943, moving to Norway in May 1945, deployed to Trondheim, Vaernes and Lade, where it disbanded in December.  One member of the squadron was mentioned in despatches.

2848 Squadron

Formed as No 848 Squadron at Angle ion 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  The squadron converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in December 1943 and joined 2nd Tactical Air Force in February 1944.  It became a Rifle squadron in September 1944 and moved to the continent in November, being deployed to Volkel, Assche, Herford, Magdeburg, Kladow, Gatow and Fassberg, where it disbanded in July 1946.

2849 Squadron

Formed as No 849 Squadron at Wing on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers.  Moving to Debden in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in July 1943 and disbanded in June 1944 into the RAF Regiment Depot, having also served at Shoreham.

2850 Squadron

Formed as No 850 Squadron at Weston on the Green on 19 December 1941, having been unnumbered from the previous April.   On 1 February 1942 all RAF Regiment Squadrons had 2000 added to their numbers, by which time it was located at Aldergrove.  Moving to St. Athan in 1942, it converted to the Light Anti Aircraft role in October 1942 and disbanded in November 1943.

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